Using client certificates in .NET part 9: working with client certificates in OWIN/Katana III

Introduction

In the previous post we added a couple of components necessary to add client certificate authentication into the OWIN middleware chain. We haven’t yet put the elements to work though. That is the main topic of this post which will finish this series. We’ll also run a couple of tests.

Have the demo application open in Visual Studio in administrator mode.

Read more of this post

Advertisements

Using client certificates in .NET part 7: working with client certificates in OWIN/Katana

Introduction

In the previous post we accomplished a couple of things. First we secured our demo Web API website with a client certificate. Second we enabled client certificates for it so that IIS doesn’t just ignore them. Finally we saw that the client certificate is also picked up in the customers controller when sent in code in a web request.

In this post we’ll start discussing how to add client certificate handling as an OWIN middleware component.

Make sure you open the demo Web API project in Visual Studio as an administrator.

Read more of this post

Using client certificates in .NET part 6: setting up client certificates for local test usage

Introduction

In the previous post we investigated how to attach a client certificate to the web request and how to extract it in a controller. We faced an issue that by default client certificates are ignored by IIS so we couldn’t actually read the certificate.

We’ll solve that problem in this post.

Read more of this post

Using client certificates in .NET part 5: working with client certificates in a web project

Introduction

In the previous post we looked at a couple pf examples on how to work with digital certificates in C# code. In particular we saw how to load certificates from a certificate store, how to search for and how to validate one.

In this post we’ll go through how to attach a client certificate to a web request and how to extract it in a .NET Web API 2 project.

Read more of this post

Using client certificates in .NET part 4: working with client certificates in code

Introduction

In the previous post we discussed how to install certificates into the certificate store. We looked at the tool mmc.exe and its certificate handler snap-in. We also inspected the imported certificates visually and verified that the client certificate is valid.

In this post we’ll see a couple of examples how to work with client certificates in code.

Read more of this post

Using client certificates in .NET part 3: installing the client certificate

Introduction

In the previous post we looked at two tools that help you create self-signed certificates: makecert.exe and pvk2pfx. Makecert performs the bulk of the certificate creation process and pvk2pfx is a packaging tool to build pfx files. Pfx files are easy to import into the certificate store. We also created a root certificate and derived a client certificated from that root. We therefore applied the idea of the chain of trust: if we trust the root then we also trust all its derived certificates.

In this post we’ll import the client certificate into the certificate store.

This process is very similar to importing the server side (SSL) certificate. We saw that process in this post.

certmgr and MMC snap in

The c:\windows\system32 folder includes two GUI tools for certificate management: certmgr.msc and mmc.exe. MMC.exe is a more general tool where you can import so-called snap-ins. Certificates have their own snap-in.

Run mmc.exe as an administrator. The following empty window will open:

Read more of this post

Using client certificates in .NET part 2: creating self signed client certificates

Introduction

In the previous post we went through a short introduction on client side certificates. We said that client certificates are used by web clients to strongly authenticate themselves. Client certificates can provide an extra step in the authentication process to tighten security.

In this post we’ll see how to create self-signed client certificates for testing using a tool called makecert.exe.

The process of creating client certificates on your local machine is almost identical to how we generated server side certificates in the series in this series.

Read more of this post

ultimatemindsettoday

A great WordPress.com site

Elliot Balynn's Blog

A directory of wonderful thoughts

Softwarearchitektur in der Praxis

Wissenswertes zu Webentwicklung, Domain-Driven Design und Microservices

Technology Talks

on Microsoft technologies, Web, Android and others

Software Engineering

Web development

Disparate Opinions

Various tidbits

chsakell's Blog

WEB APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT BEST PRACTICES WITH MICROSOFT STACK & ANGULAR

Cyber Matters

Bite-size insight on Cyber Security for the not too technical.

Guru N Guns's

OneSolution To dOTnET.

Johnny Zraiby

Measuring programming progress by lines of code is like measuring aircraft building progress by weight.

%d bloggers like this: