Using client certificates in .NET part 9: working with client certificates in OWIN/Katana III

Introduction

In the previous post we added a couple of components necessary to add client certificate authentication into the OWIN middleware chain. We haven’t yet put the elements to work though. That is the main topic of this post which will finish this series. We’ll also run a couple of tests.

Have the demo application open in Visual Studio in administrator mode.

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Using client certificates in .NET part 8: working with client certificates in OWIN/Katana II

Introduction

In the previous post we started adding the necessary OWIN-related libraries to our Web API project: a couple of NuGet libraries and the Startup class. We publish our application to the local IIS and it doesn’t allow us to break the code within Startup.cs. We’ll soon see that we can still debug the OWIN components further down the call stack.

In this post we’ll add the necessary elements to a client certificate based authentication in .NET MVC with OWIN.

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Wiring up a custom authentication method with OWIN in Web API Part 5: abstracting away the auth logic

Introduction

In the previous post we built the necessary OWIN components for our custom authentication logic: the middleware and the extension method that’s attached to the IAppBuilder object. We also diverged a little and discussed how to use the Use extension method to inject the necessary objects into the constructor of the middleware class.

In this post we’ll extend PinAuthenticationHandler so that the actual authentication logic can be easily changed.

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Wiring up a custom authentication method with OWIN in Web API Part 4: putting the components to work

Introduction

In the previous post we built two important components around the custom authentication logic. First off, we wrote a very simple implementation of the abstract AuthenticationOptions class where we only declared the name of the authentication mode. You can anyway add any extra property and overloaded constructors as you wish to this class. Then we built the custom authentication handler, i.e. PinAuthenticationHandler which derives from the abstract AuthenticationHandler class.

In this post we’ll add a couple more components specifically to add our authentication handler to the OWIN chain. We’ll also test the authentication logic.

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Wiring up a custom authentication method with OWIN in Web API Part 3: the components

Introduction

In the previous post we looked at HTTP headers in code. We saw how to collect the headers from a request and a response and how to check for the presence of a certain header type. We also built a simple tester C# console application that sends a web request to our Web API controller and sets the necessary custom authentication header.

In this post we’ll start building the components necessary for the OWIN middleware.

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Wiring up a custom authentication method with OWIN in Web API Part 2: the headers

Introduction

In the previous post we discussed the main topic of this series and started building a demo application with a single Customers controller. The goal of this series is to show how to register your custom authentication mechanism with OWIN as a Katana component.

In this post we’ll be concentrating on the request headers. We’ll also see a couple of functions that will later be part of the OWIN middleware when we’re ready to convert the code.

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Wiring up a custom authentication method with OWIN in Web API Part 1: preparation

Introduction

There are a number of authentication types for a web project: basic -i.e. with username and password -, or token-based or claims-based authentication and various others. You can also have some custom authentication type that your project requires.

In this short series we’ll go through how to wire up a custom authentication method in a Web API project. We’ll see the classes that are required for such an infrastructure. We’ll also discuss how to wire up these elements so that the custom authentication mechanism is executed as part of the chain of Katana components.

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Handling claims transformation in an OWIN middleware in .NET MVC part 4

Introduction

In the previous post we turned our claims transformation code into OWIN middleware. We went through the process of creating a component – the ClaimsTransformationComponent – and registering it with OWIN in Startup.cs. We set the current claims principal in our component which is then available within the controllers.

In this post which finishes this series we’ll diverge a little from our main topic and take a look at how we can add dependencies to an OWIN component.

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Handling claims transformation in an OWIN middleware in .NET MVC part 3

Introduction

In the previous post we built upon our MVC claims transformation demo. Specifically we saw how to take the incoming claims and add a couple of custom ones by pretending that we query some data store. We wired up all the demo code in the HomeController.

The goal of this closing post is to reorganise the claims-related code into OWIN middleware.

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Handling claims transformation in an OWIN middleware in .NET MVC part 2

Introduction

In the previous post we laid the foundations for this short series. We went through a refresher of claims and OWIN and started building a simple ASP.NET MVC web project to investigate what’s available about the user of the current thread in a controller. We saw that by default the only claim available about a user might be their name, unless they are anonymous of course.

In this post we’ll continue to explore claims of authenticated users.

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