How to hide the text entered in a .NET console application

You’ve probably encountered console applications that ask for a password. It’s very likely that the password will stay hidden otherwise other people viewing your screen can easily read it.

This short post will present a possible solution on how to achieve a hidden string input in a .NET console application.

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Implementing an enumerator for a custom object in .NET C#

You can create an enumerator for a custom type by implementing the generic IEnumerable of T interface. Normally you’d do that if you want to create a custom collection that others will be able to iterate over using foreach. However, there’s nothing stopping you from adding an enumerator to any custom type if you feel like it, it’s really simple.

Consider the following Guest class:

public class Guest
{
	public string Name { get; set; }
	public int Age { get; set; }
}

Guests can be invited to a Party:

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Keeping the key-values sorted by using a SortedDictionary with C# .NET

You can use the generic SortedDictionary of Key and Value to automatically keep the key value items sorted by their keys. Any time you add a new key value pair the dictionary will reorder the items. The SortedDictionary was optimised for frequent changes to its list of items. Keep in mind that the items will be sorted by their key and not their value.

Consider the following simple custom object:

public class Student
{
	public string Name { get; set; }
	public string SchoolName { get; set; }
}

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Waiting for background tasks to finish using the CompletableFuture class in Java

Introduction

In this post we saw how to wait for a number background tasks to finish using the CountDownLatch class. The starting point for the discussion was the following situation:

Imagine that you execute a number of long running methods. Also, let’s say that the very last time consuming process depends on the previous processes, let’s call them prerequisites. The dependence is “sequential” meaning that the final stage should only run if the prerequisites have all completed and returned. The first implementation may very well be sequential where the long running methods are called one after the other and each of them blocks the main thread.

However, in case the prerequisites can be executed independently then there’s a much better solution: we can execute them in parallel instead. Independence in this case means that prerequisite A doesn’t need any return value from prerequisite B in which case parallel execution of A and B is not an option.

In this post we’ll look at an alternative solution using the CompletableFuture class. It is way more versatile than CountDownLatch which is really only sort of like a simple lock object. CompletableFuture offers a wide range of possibilities to organise your threads with a fluent API. Here we’ll start off easy with a simple application of this class.

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Sharing primitives across threads in Java using atomic objects

Threading and parallel execution are popular choices when making applications more responsive and resource-efficient. Various tasks are carried out on separate threads where they either produce some result relevant to the main thread or just run in the background “unnoticed”. Often these tasks work autonomously meaning they have their own set of dependencies and variables. That is they do not interfere with a resource that is common to 2 or more threads.

However, that’s not always the case. Imagine that multiple threads are trying to update the same primitive like an integer counter. They perform some action and then update this counter. In this post we’ll see what can go wrong.

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Using the KeyedCollection object in C# .NET

The abstract generic KeyedCollection object can be used to declare which field of your custom object to use as a key in a Dictionary. It provides sort of a short-cut where you’d want to organise your objects in a Dictionary by an attribute of that object.

Let’s take the following object as an example:

public class CloudServer
{
	public string CloudProvider { get; set; }
	public string ImageId { get; set; }
	public string Size { get; set; }
}

The Image IDs are always unique so the ImageId property seems to be a good candidate for a dictionary key.

Here’s an example:

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Getting notified when collection changes with ObservableCollection in C# .NET

Imagine that you’d like to be notified when something is changed in a collection, e.g. an item is added or removed. One possible solution is to use the built-in .NET generic collection type ObservableCollection of T which is located in the System.Collections.ObjectModel namespace. The ObservableCollection object has an event called CollectionChanged. You can hook up an event handler to be notified of the changes.

If you don’t know what events, event handlers and delegates mean then start here.

Let’s see a simple example with a collection of strings:

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