How to hash passwords with a salt in .NET

In this post we learnt about using hashing in .NET. We also saw one of its basic functions in the same post which is message verification. In this post we saw how hashing coupled with a random key can be used for message authentication.

We also mentioned another common usage of hashing which is password storage. A password should never be stored as clear text in your system. Instead we save its hash value and when a user enters a password in a login field then we compare the hashed values instead of the plain string passwords. However, a simple one-way hash is generally still not good enough.

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Using HMACs to authenticate a hash in .NET

In this post we learnt about using hashing in .NET. Hashes provide a one-way encryption of a message where the hash value ideally cannot be “unhashed”, i.e. we cannot build the original string from it. A hash or message digest helps us verify whether the message has been tampered with by a third party after it was sent to us.

We can take a step further and add an extra layer of security on our hashes. After all a message and its hash could originate from anyone. How can we verify the authenticity of the message as well? That’s where Hashed Message Authentication Codes, also called HashMACs or HMACs enter the picture.

Read more of this post

How to hash passwords with a salt in .NET

In this post we learnt about using hashing in .NET. We also saw one of its basic functions in the same post which is message verification. In this post we saw how hashing coupled with a random key can be used for message authentication.

We also mentioned another common usage of hashing which is password storage. A password should never be stored as clear text in your system. Instead we save its hash value and when a user enters a password in a login field then we compare the hashed values instead of the plain string passwords. However, a simple one-way hash is generally still not good enough.

Read more of this post

Using HMACs to authenticate a hash in .NET

In this post we learnt about using hashing in .NET. Hashes provide a one-way encryption of a message where the hash value ideally cannot be “unhashed”, i.e. we cannot build the original string from it. A hash or message digest helps us verify whether the message has been tampered with by a third party after it was sent to us.

We can take a step further and add an extra layer of security on our hashes. After all a message and its hash could originate from anyone. How can we verify the authenticity of the message as well? That’s where Hashed Message Authentication Codes, also called HashMACs or HMACs enter the picture.

Read more of this post

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