How to declare natural ordering by overriding the comparison operators in C# .NET

In this post we saw one way to declare natural ordering for a custom class by implementing the generic IComparable of T interface. In this post we’ll look at how to achieve the same by overriding the 4 comparison operators:

<
>
<=
>=

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How to declare natural ordering by implementing the generic IComparer interface in C# .NET

In this post we showed how to declare natural ordering for a custom type by implementing the generic IComparable interface. We saw that it required us to implement the CompareTo method. The example we looked at was a simple Triangle class where we said that triangles can be ordered based on their areas. That’s probably a reasonable comparison for triangle.

However, what about the following object?

public class Building
{
	public double Area { get; set; }
	public int NumberOfRooms { get; set; }
	public string Address { get; set; }
	public bool ForSale { get; set; }
	public DateTime DateBuilt { get; set; }
}

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How to declare natural ordering by implementing the generic IComparable interface in C# .NET

Primitive types such as integers can be ordered naturally in some way. Numeric and alphabetical ordering comes in handy with numbers and strings. However, there’s no natural ordering for your own custom objects with a number of properties.

Consider the following Triangle class:

public class Triangle
{
	public double BaseSide { get; set; }
	public double Height { get; set; }

	public double Area
	{
		get
		{
			return (BaseSide * Height) / 2;
		}
	}
}

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