About

About me:

My name is Andras Nemes and work as a web developer / jr. architect in Stockholm, Sweden. I mostly develop in .NET and pretty much everything related to web development: SQL, C#, HTML, CSS, jQuery and the like. I devote about 20% of my time to Java. I really like programming and programming languages. I think it is the best kind of job one can have: it requires patience, thoughtfulness, creativity, careful planning and reasoning.

My main interest lies in the middle-ware section of an application: services, repositories, domains, web services, i.e. those parts that connect the UI with the data storage mechanism. I’m not so much of a UI and client-side development person.

You can find me on LinkedIn here.

About this blog:

I originally wanted to document stuff that I learned or read about or problems that I came across in my job for later reference. Then I thought that these documents might be interesting for other developers out there as well so I signed up with WordPress. I’ll try to stick to the following blogging schedule:

  • I’ll reserve Mondays and Thursdays for lengthier posts and series
  • On other weekdays I’ll post short and concise code blocks mostly on LINQ and the TPL

I might occasionally miss these dates due to holidays and family life.

Topics will include anything related to .NET so I’m not intending to concentrate on 1-2 key areas.

Regarding the Longs

My target audience is beginner to intermediate .NET developers who want to learn new concepts from the ground up. The goal with every post is to give a detailed account of a topic from the basics – at least as detailed as can be expected by a blog post as opposed to an entire book. I hope that you’ll be then equipped with enough knowledge to be able to continue researching the more advanced areas of a given topic. I like teaching and training people so my goal is to be as educational as possible.

Regarding the Shorts

These posts are meant to hold short and concise code examples without providing a lot of detail on the topic. They are targeted at those who are looking for quick solutions without caring much about the theoretical foundations.

Comments and the source code

I’ll do my best to answer comments, but keep in mind that this is strictly a free time activity on my side. I have a full time job, a family and some private projects as well.

You may use the provided code samples as you like. I’ve run all code samples on my PC but make sure to test them in your own environment as well. Check out this page for the code examples available on GitHub. Links and references are welcome if you use any material from this blog.

3 Responses to About

  1. I recently found your blog and have really enjoyed your posts, especially the series about claims and security. It seems about half the times the code samples end up HTML encoded which sometimes makes them hard to follow, especially with a lot of angle brackets and lambdas. Any chance that can be fixed?

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